EssaysFeatureRace

Staying Where They Belong

Trump's white nationalism, and a history of American racism, is on display with his attacks on "the Squad."

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EssaysFeature

“Bloody Gina,” the CIA, and the Senate

Why Gina Haspel's confirmation hearing was a democratic farce

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FeatureReviews

The Sound of a Thunder

Weatherman and the Music of Late-Life Regrets

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EssaysFeatureIn Depth

The Death Stops Here: The Death and Resurrection of Daniel Berrigan

Fidgety and a little bored in the crammed pews of the Church of St. Francis Xavier, my eight-year-old son waited with us for the service to begin. For distraction and readiness, he etched on his program, with his parents’ help: “Today we reflect on the life of Daniel Berrigan. He was a great priest, prophet, poet and peacemaker. He touched many lives with his actions and words. It is nice to be in such a beautiful church with so many people honoring a man they loved.” Simple and true, these words presaged a ceremony that edified and even transformed the two thousand or so people blessed to have been there. The death on April 30 of the 94-year-old Fr. Dan Berrigan, S.J. at a Jesuit infirmary in New York City has been big news. Heartfelt obituaries have poured forth: from fellow priest and political troublemaker John Dear; from the rogue Washington Post columnist Coleman McCarthy, …

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Arts & DesignReviews

The Guantánamo Saga in Laurie Anderson’s “Habeas Corpus”

A review and reflection

On a brilliantly sunny, fall afternoon, a dozen members of Witness Against Torture — a grassroots group long dedicated to closing the prison camp at Guantánamo — broke from our marathon strategy meeting to see the GTMO-themed installation of the renowned performance artist Laurie Anderson. Titled “Habeas Corpus,” the groundbreaking exhibit was up …

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